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Tag Archives | Paddy Pallin

2024 Bushwalking NSW Photo Competition

2024 Bushwalking NSW Photo Competition

Show us your best shots!

Do you take beautiful photos of people and scenery in the bush?

We want to share them with the world!

Image: Sunset from Mt Townsend, Robert Croll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enter our competition to be in the running to win over $230 of great Paddy Pallin prizes! See your photos featured in our newsletters and on our website!

Share your NSW/ACT photos of bushwalkers or wildlife in nature or a national park scene.

Please share your photos in these categories:

  • People bushwalking as team enjoying nature in NSW/ACT
  • NSW/ACT national park scene
  • NSW/ACT wildlife

Simply email your images or a public link to your photos (eg google drive, dropbox or photo share apps) to Bushwalking NSW here.

Great Paddy Pallin gear to be won!

 

 

Smartwool patch beanie
Gear aid hybrid gear clip
Arcade performance stretch belt
Ultralight dry sack 20L
Nalgene glow in the dark bottle
Nalgene wide mouth bottle 32oz

Results – BNSW outdoor adventure terminology survey

Thank you to Paddy Pallin and Wild Magazine for providing great prizes!

By Jon Grey, BNSW Young People in Clubs Working Group, youngpeopleinclubs@bushwalkingnsw.org.au

The Terminology Survey aimed to examine people’s opinions and perceptions about the terminology currently used to describe bushwalking, related activities and associated clubs. It was exploring a proposition that naming and terminology used in conjunction with bushwalking clubs may influence the level of interest and desire to participate in our clubs, particularly from younger people.

The survey was open for the 4-month period to the end of January 2024, and had a total of 173 respondents. The key findings are summarised below, followed by a graphical presentation of the results.

Q1. Please rank the following terms from the most to least inspiring and ‘cool.

The three most popular terms were 1. outdoor adventuring; 2. Hiking; then 3. bushwalking, followed by wildwalking, trekking and walking. The precise ordering varied depending on the use of either a weighted score or first preference score system.

Q2. Rank the following Club names from most to least inspiring and ‘cool’. Which Club would you be most proud to be a member of?

The three most popular names for the fictional bushwalking club were: 1. Highlands Outdoor Adventure Club; 2. Highlands Bushwalking and Outdoor Adventure Club; and 3. Highland Hikers, which were all notably ahead of the Highlands Bushwalking Club. The two club names that contained the term ‘outdoor adventure’ received a combined 50% of first preferences, compared to just 8% for the club with ‘bushwalking’ alone.

Q3. Do you believe a club name should reflect more than bushwalking if other activities (eg, cycling, canyoning or kayaking) are undertaken?

83% of respondents strongly or slightly agreed that the name of a club should include more than bushwalking if other activities such as cycling, canyoning or kayaking were undertaken (including 55% who strongly agreed).

Q4. Would the name of an outdoor club or organisation influence your perception of how exciting, dynamic and ‘cool’ it was?

75% of respondents indicated that it was highly or somewhat likely that their perception of how exciting, dynamic and ‘cool’ a club or organisation was, would be influenced by its name.

Q5. If an outdoor club had an exciting, dynamic and ‘cool’ image, would this encourage you to join it and possibly participate in leadership roles?

59% of respondents indicated that they were highly or somewhat likely to be encouraged to join an outdoor club and possibly participate in leadership roles if it had an exciting, dynamic and ‘cool’ image.

Q9. Other comments?

Of the 73 specific comments received, there was a wide range of views. 34% supported the importance of terminology, 49% were neutral or raised other issues to consider, and 16% were clearly not supportive of the importance of terminology. The comments emphasised the importance of other issues besides terminology such as the need for a strong social media presence (with images portraying younger generations); a welcoming club culture and varied club programs. 73 respondents made comments, ranging from:

    • Supportive of the importance of terminology: 34%

    e.g. ‘Image can be everything when it comes to membership’;

    Words matter! the name is important’

    • Neutral or raising other issues: 49%

    e.g. ‘I would love to join outdoor clubs but cannot usually see myself in any of the imagery. It is usually people 30+ years older than me’

    • Statements clearly not supportive of importance of terminology: 16%

    e.g. ‘I think terminology is probably much less of an issue than technology and culture of clubs’

Respondent personal data  (total 173)

  • There were no significant differences between responses from the younger to older generations of respondents.

The results of the survey, particularly the hard statistical data, do overall suggest the potential importance of naming and terminology in the bushwalking and outdoor adventure movement for enhancing our image and possibly appealing more to younger generations. There is a strong preference for naming and terminology that includes ‘outdoor adventure’ and for names that indicate more than just ‘bushwalking ‘where other outdoor activities are undertaken. A large proportion of respondents indicated they might consider participating in leadership roles if a club or organisation had an exciting image. The qualitative comments reflected a range of views but highlighted the importance of multiple issues in attracting younger members into clubs.

A conclusion from the results would appear to be that individual clubs should at least consider possible slight renaming and rebranding of their clubs, with an enhanced focus on outdoor adventure activity in addition to bushwalking alone. Such a change, in conjunction with other measures such as enhanced social media presence, welcoming attitudes and promotion of the benefits of joining our clubs, may revitalise our clubs and possibly help attract younger generations.

Age Range (Q6):

 

 

Bushwalking Activity with (Q7):

Jon Grey

BNSW Young People in Clubs Working Group

mailto:youngpeopleinclubs@bushwalkingnsw.org.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bush Club

Hidden Sydney – Balmain, Monday 18 July 2022, Col Prentice and Trevor McAlister

A total of 25 Bush Club participants discovered Hidden Sydney while walking from Circular Quay to Circular Quay via Balmain and the ferry. Participants benefited from the combined expertise of two experienced leaders/historians while walking around this most interesting of Sydney’s suburbs. Col Prentice lead the morning session and Trevor McAlister lead after lunch.

Our walk was mostly on pavement and explored places in Balmain that we probably hadn’t been to before while alerting us to traces of history that still remain visible today. There was a brief commentary and plenty of opportunity to stroll and reflect on Sydney’s past.

Highlights of the walk included a widows’ walk, a tram drivers’ dunny, a policeman’s out-house, a house of a former NSW Premier (he sired 17 children and married at 80; can you guess who?), a cross harbour tunnel built in 1924, a place celebrated for the first game of Rugby League played, a spectacularly fine day, a sea voyage, a bus ride and a happy, outgoing and generous group of people. All this and more could have been yours if you had taken the opportunity to join us. And remember, twelve panes of glass equals one Georgian cottage and regular exercise equals longevity. We all look forward to seeing you next time!

Our August Club: The Bush Club

The Bush Club started on 19th September 1939, mainly as a result of the initiative of Marie Byles and Paddy Pallin. Marie was concerned that the rather rigorous tests to obtain entry to bush walking clubs existing at the time excluded genuine lovers of the bush who were unwilling or unable to pack walk and camp out overnight. Marie believed that the essential qualifications for members should be a genuine love of the bush, a desire to protect it and a willingness to extend the hand of friendship to other bushwalkers.

Paddy had similar motivation in joining with Marie to form the club. He hoped the club would comprise walkers of moderate ability who would not be forced to indulge in camping if they had no wish to do so. Paddy was also strongly of the view that if people became bushwalkers they would also become lovers of the bush and would join the ranks of the conservationists seeking its protection. These thoughts remain the main aim of the Bush Club.

Today The Bush Club organises fun activities in the outdoors. From easy strolls to the adrenaline tough walks; from lakes to mountains; and from the city to the magical bush. The Club believes that getting outdoors and enjoying the wonderful bush around us is a great boost for the body and soul.

Joining The Bush Club is a great way to meet new people and make great friends. Club members are a diverse and friendly bunch who share experiences, learn new things and help each other along the way.