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Archive | Bushwalking club management resources

Newcastle Ramblers 60th Anniversary

Formed in 1961 as Newcastle YMCA Ramblers Bushwalking Club, the Club later became just Newcastle Ramblers. The club was due to celebrate its 60th birthday last year, but COVID caused several postponements. The celebration is now scheduled for Saturday 15 October and will be held at Rathmines Hall on Lake Macquarie.

The day will begin early with activities in the area for those interested (walks, kayaking and cycling) before a welcome and morning tea. Several members will then give short talks on the early days of the club and up to today. The talks will be followed by a catered lunch and more social time. For those interested there may be a barbecue in the park beside the lake afterwards.

Former members or anyone interested is welcome to attend. Even if you cannot come we would still like to hear from you.

Please contact Bob Clifton by email – robert.clifton@outlook.com.au or by phone on 0417 624 091 by 15 September.

Wilsons Prom 1996

 

The Bush Club

Hidden Sydney – Balmain, Monday 18 July 2022, Col Prentice and Trevor McAlister

A total of 25 Bush Club participants discovered Hidden Sydney while walking from Circular Quay to Circular Quay via Balmain and the ferry. Participants benefited from the combined expertise of two experienced leaders/historians while walking around this most interesting of Sydney’s suburbs. Col Prentice lead the morning session and Trevor McAlister lead after lunch.

Our walk was mostly on pavement and explored places in Balmain that we probably hadn’t been to before while alerting us to traces of history that still remain visible today. There was a brief commentary and plenty of opportunity to stroll and reflect on Sydney’s past.

Highlights of the walk included a widows’ walk, a tram drivers’ dunny, a policeman’s out-house, a house of a former NSW Premier (he sired 17 children and married at 80; can you guess who?), a cross harbour tunnel built in 1924, a place celebrated for the first game of Rugby League played, a spectacularly fine day, a sea voyage, a bus ride and a happy, outgoing and generous group of people. All this and more could have been yours if you had taken the opportunity to join us. And remember, twelve panes of glass equals one Georgian cottage and regular exercise equals longevity. We all look forward to seeing you next time!

Our August Club: The Bush Club

The Bush Club started on 19th September 1939, mainly as a result of the initiative of Marie Byles and Paddy Pallin. Marie was concerned that the rather rigorous tests to obtain entry to bush walking clubs existing at the time excluded genuine lovers of the bush who were unwilling or unable to pack walk and camp out overnight. Marie believed that the essential qualifications for members should be a genuine love of the bush, a desire to protect it and a willingness to extend the hand of friendship to other bushwalkers.

Paddy had similar motivation in joining with Marie to form the club. He hoped the club would comprise walkers of moderate ability who would not be forced to indulge in camping if they had no wish to do so. Paddy was also strongly of the view that if people became bushwalkers they would also become lovers of the bush and would join the ranks of the conservationists seeking its protection. These thoughts remain the main aim of the Bush Club.

Today The Bush Club organises fun activities in the outdoors. From easy strolls to the adrenaline tough walks; from lakes to mountains; and from the city to the magical bush. The Club believes that getting outdoors and enjoying the wonderful bush around us is a great boost for the body and soul.

Joining The Bush Club is a great way to meet new people and make great friends. Club members are a diverse and friendly bunch who share experiences, learn new things and help each other along the way.

 

Hill View Bushwalkers

A wander in Hornsby, Normanhurst, Waitara & Wahroonga, 8 July 2022, Barbara R

After a week of flooding rain, necessitating the cancellation of the three planned walks for July 8th, a huge mob (41) of Hill View Bushwalkers turned up at Hornsby Station to enjoy an urban walk in brilliant sunshine.

After a longer briefing than usual, which included some history of the area, we headed west past the murals in Dural Lane and on to Frederick Street where we saw the hidden away but impressive California bungalow house & large garden of Leo & Florence Cotton.

Leo Cotton was a highly regarded geologist who became Professor of Geology at Sydney University after the retirement of his mentor & friend Sir Tannatt William Edgeworth David, also a Hornsby resident. Both men went to Antarctica in 1907-8 with Mawson & Shackleton. Leo’s brother Max (also a scholar) bought part of the Cotton property in 1917 to develop Lisgar Gardens. Florence Cotton Reserve (opposite the Frederick St house) is named after Leo’s wife who died in 1930 after only twenty years of marriage.

We crossed Waitara Creek on a bridge near Carcoola Crescent & soon found a hidden pathway & steps through bushland to the crossing of a tributary creek & ascent to a pleasant morning tea spot behind Normanhurst Scout Hall & overlooking the valley.

We realised that was enough flirtation with soggy bushland for the day! Later, a foot track & path were followed from Dartford Road on the southern side of the railway line to Normanhurst Station & Edwards Road from where we walked up quiet Russell Avenue to the source of Waitara Creek & to Pennant Hills Road. Soon another hidden lane off the Pacific Highway was followed to Anulla Place Reserve from where we made our way to & through bushland behind The Grange & through this 1980s Retirement Village to Waitara Station.

At this stage we had walked over 9kms so twelve people decided they’d enjoyed enough exercise for the day & caught a train to their various destinations. Those who had their sights set on lunch in Wahroonga Park, followed the highway SE to Carden Avenue then a path that follows the railway to a footbridge over the M1, on to Warwilla Avenue & the pedestrian rail overpass to our lunch destination. Nine stalwarts stayed for excellent coffee at the Coonanbarra Cafe opposite the park.

On the approximately 13km walk we only (temporarily & briefly) lost three people! Not bad considering the crowd. 😂 Lessons were learnt… & the abandoned were gracious… The usual HVB camaraderie reached a new level after the week of watery isolation and a great time was had by all.

Leaders: Barbara R & Steve

Walkers: Helen A, Nick B, Barbara C, Susan, Rhondda, Ann D, Tim, Elaine, Michael, Jane, John G, Ros G, Christine G, Carol, Celia, Cherry, Kas, Chris McA, Bill McD, Lydia, John M, Hazel, Margaret P, Wendy P, Pragati, David R, Anne R, Christine S, John S, Jenny S, Nick S, Sue S, Lyn, Cleona, Louis, Don W as well as visiting walkers Rosemary Wade (becoming our newest member), Irene Soon & Cheong Lai

Thanks to Nick B for being tail end Charlie.

Our thanks to Barbara R for planning the route and for many hours of historical research.

Our July Club: Hill View Bushwalkers

Hill View Bushwalkers (HVB) has Friday walks from mid-February to mid-November. HVB began in a small way in the early 1970s, growing gradually and retaining a quite informal structure. The spirit of friendship and care that was nurtured in those early years has been maintained, and it is rewarding to be associated with this group.

We are an incorporated group affiliated with Bushwalking NSW. We have walks at three levels of activity led by members who volunteer to lead walks that appeal to them.

The Plus walking group usually has a walk ranging from 14 to 20 kilometres, with substantial ascents and descents though the distance may be less in difficult terrain.

The Regular walking group will usually walk between 9 and 13 kilometres, with less vigorous climbs.

A third group, the EZY walking group, is for those who now find the first two types of walk a bit difficult and wish to walk at a slower pace, with walks of up to 8 kilometres. These walks are currently held fortnightly.

We tend to have a fairly mature membership that includes many part-time workers and retired people.

A weekend away is occasionally arranged to a place where there is low-cost accommodation and good day walks, such as the Snowy Mountains or NSW South Coast.

Members have two six-month programs each year, providing a weekly walk from mid February until mid November.

Development of each program starts with a subcommittee preparing a list of proposed walks. This is then circulated to members, who indicate which walks they are prepared to lead (two leaders to each walk). When all the gaps are filled the program is finalised and published. Walks are all within reach of a one day trip from the meeting point in Turramurra, enabling us to walk in the Blue Mountains, the Central Coast and Royal National Park areas as well as in Sydney.

The number of participants is not limited (unless by COVID restrictions) and leaders make arrangements to ensure all walkers are included.

Every walk has 2 First Aiders nominated. First Aid training is encouraged by a substantial subsidy towards the cost.

The leaders walk the track shortly before leading a group in order to ensure the conditions are suitable.

If the advertised walk needs to be modified, or leaders judge that participants need more information, then a WALKS ADVISORY is issued.

We usually drive with car pooling, but where possible we use public transport.

We are COVID safe. Our program and procedure is modified in response to COVID restrictions as appropriate.

Coffs Hikers

Coffs Hikers climb Tuckers Nob, Orara West State Forest/Bindarra National Park, March 2022, Yvonne, Coffs Hikers

Tuckers Nob is a local landmark, with a great view to the Dorrigo escarpment, and the Bellinger Valley to the sea. In March, walkers from Coffs Hikers set off from the north side of the mountain following Frontage Creek up steeply through Orara West State Forest on logging tracks.

Close to the top is a track labelled on the map as “That Steep Bit”, and it is certainly steep! The forest vegetation changes as we approach the summit (874 metres) and the view opens up. There is a geocache hiding here.

After a rest on a rough hewn bench to enjoy our lunch, we start cautiously down that steep bit again, stopping on the way to admire Fig Tree Falls in full flow after rain. Then it’s back to the cars to clean off the mud and remove any free passengers (aka leeches).

Our June Club: Coffs Hikers

Coffs Hikers is a new Bushwalking NSW club in Coffs Harbour on the mid-north coast, with a fast-growing membership. The Club is spoilt for choice with many national parks, state forests, coastal walks, creeks and the great escarpment offering many opportunities for wild explorations! The Club currently offers day walks, overnight walks and camping, but hope to offer cycling and kayaking in future.

In the Club’s first six months, 84 club members have enjoyed 321 outdoor experiences together on 39 activities. These have included soggy off-track in the jungle, steep climbs to lookouts, camping at Gibraltar Ranges, map and compass training and gentler coastal rambles.

For more information visit the Club website or Facebook page. In addition Coffs Trails publishes routes of many walks in the Coffs area.

 

‘Acknowledgement of Country’ by Bushwalking Clubs

‘Acknowledgement of country’ by bushwalking clubs

Bushwalking NSW have recently been asked an interesting question from one of our affiliated clubs: “_Just wondering if any of the bushwalking clubs are doing `acknowledgement of country’ on their walks. We would like to include this in our programmed walks and would be interested to hear if other clubs are carrying this out._” So … are any clubs acknowledging Country before they step into that country?

You will notice that at the top of the BNSW newsletter we now have a statement of acknowledgement: “_Bushwalking NSW acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia, and acknowledges and respects their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their Elders past, present and emerging, and acknowledge their custodianship of the Country in which we engage our bushwalking and related activities”._

Since all bushwalking clubs rely on Country as a core resource for our outdoor activities, it would seem appropriate for clubs to include a similar statement on their websites. It is now customary to acknowledge Country at the start of meetings and the same could also be done at the start of walks and other activities.

Clubs may wish to acknowledge the local indigenous people of their specific region or area. You can find an authorised map of language groups here. Note that some areas may come under the influence of two or more language groups. Also please be aware of the stated restrictions on reproducing the map.

You may wish to adapt BNSW’s words for your own use:

<_Your Bushwalking Club name> acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of <Your Indigenous Nation> Country, and acknowledges and respects their connections to land, sea _[optional; not relevant if you are inland club_] and community. We pay our respect to their Elders past, present and emerging, and acknowledge their custodianship of the Country in which we engage our bushwalking and related activities.

Thank you for considering this important issue.

Bill Boyd, President, Bushwalking NSW

Canberra Bushwalking Club – Safe River Crossings Training

River Safety Training, Cotter River, February 2021, Canberra Bushwalking Club

At the start of 2021 Canberra Bushwalking Club held a challenging and interesting activity for members – a river-crossing training exercise. Held in the clear waters of the Cotter River, 26 club members attended keen to learn how to cross rivers safely.

The training was recommended for leaders and anyone contemplating walking in New Zealand or Tasmania. The course covered teaching participants how to assess a river, identify the safest crossing place and solo and team crossing techniques. Participants practiced these techniques in water up to thigh deep and also had the opportunity to practice swimming with a pack.

The day was highly successful with all participants agreeing that the course helped them to learn these essential life-saving skills. Watch more here to learn more about river safety.

Our Club of the Month: Canberra Bushwalking Club

Canberra Bushwalking Club was founded in 1961 and currently has over 400 members. While the Club’s main activity is bushwalking it also offers canoeing, canyoning, caving, conservation work parties, cross-country skiing, cycling, geocaching, liloing and social activities. Check out the Club’s Facebook page to see more.

Features of the Canberra Bushwalking Club include:

  • A range of activities – from easy urban rambles and walks suitable for families with toddlers, to multi-day expeditions in rough and remote areas
  • Training programs in navigation and other topics
  • Strong emphasis on safety
  • Modest annual membership fees (currently $40)
  • Non-members welcome on activities, with agreement of walk leader (up to 3 activities)
  • Participants covered by public liability insurance
  • Monthly meetings with guest speakers

Young People in Bushwalking Clubs

Notwithstanding reports that hiking and outdoor adventure has become fashionable for millennials, bushwalking clubs continue to seek ways to attract younger people.  An experienced young bushwalker keen to help clubs address this issue is National Parks Association of the ACT Committee Member Stef De Montis – age 32. Stef bush camps regularly in Australia’s high country and is also a keen runner, cyclist, skier and photographer.

Stef is interviewed in the June 2021 NPA Bulletin. He is passionate about helping clubs to attract younger members and believes this is needed to provide future club leaders and members. He highlights the importance of attracting young people to clubs to gain valuable life skills and an awareness of the importance of environmental protection.

Stef feels that many young people may be missing a sense of community in our modern world and that building friendships in a group setting will enhance young people’s ability to maintain their commitment to important causes.

To attract younger people Stef suggests that clubs hold social events aimed at, and run by, younger people.  Clubs can also harness the skills of experienced members by promoting informal mentorship programs to make young people feel welcome and develop their skills. He also believes that initiatives such as photography competitions and maintaining a strong online presence are ways clubs can encourage young people to get involved.

If you would like to read further, Bushwalking NSW has previously discussed similar ideas for clubs to consider, such as:

  • Consideration of the current average age of club members and if there is a need to appeal to a younger demographic
  • Identifying the potential reasons young people are not engaging with clubs
  • Identifying the skills and benefits clubs can provide to young people and the best way they can be be made aware of them
  • How to harness and pass on the skills of experienced members, for example, through mentoring opportunities
  • Consideration of how walks can be scheduled around young people’s work and or study commitments
  • Available opportunities to partner with local training organisations

What is the current demographic of your club and how successful have you been in attracting younger members? Let us know your experience and views – we would love to hear from you! – feel free to email Justine Bourke at newsletter@bushwalkingnsw.org.au

Clarence Valley Bushwalking Club – Bunya Mountains Trip

Bunya Mountains Trip, Bunya Mountains and Girraween National Parks, Clarence Valley Bushwalking Club

Ray Bulmer originally conceived the idea of the annual trip to Bunya Mountains and Girraween National Parks for our bushwalking holiday. He put in a huge amount of preparation and drew up a great itinerary with a good mix of walking and sightseeing with some wonderful places to stay. Unfortunately he was not able to come on the trip due to ill health and we missed him greatly.

The group consisted of Michael, Christine, Steve, Moira, Joan, Jan, Stephanie, Kent, Narelle, Stuart. We set off on Saturday September 7th. As we left our area in Gulmarrad we remarked on how much the Shark Creek fire had grown in the last day and then we drove off towards Grafton, never guessing the fire would grow so big in the next few days whilst we were away.  Fires were starting up all over the valley and throughout NSW and this was to be a constant theme throughout the holiday. We packed our car up in 35 deg heat, with the sky turning orange and filling with smoke.

We consulted the night before on the best route to avoid fires and some of us kept to Ray’s original route via Glen Innes. We stopped off for the obligatory coffee break at McDonald’s in Glen Innes and a second breakfast. Others travelled via Kyogle. We passed through Stanthorpe and Tenterfield, witnessing the burnt areas from their bushfires only the day before. They had burnt both sides of the road in some places up to people’s garden fences so it was a sobering reminder of our vulnerability. We were all able to meet up at Warwick for a late lunch. Then we pressed on to our first overnight destination, Jondaryan Woolshed. We were saddened to see how dry the countryside was along the way. We set up camp in their campground and hunkered down for our first dinner in an increasing wind.

The next day we explored the extensive historic site at Jondaryan and there was certainly a lot to see. But first we had to have a hearty breakfast at their café. This was bushwalking in style. Then we visited the many historic buildings, the largest being their magnificent Woolshed itself. Many of the historic buildings had museum displays inside them. The school was one of the most interest.

The next day we set off for the short distance to Maidenwell which we were going to use as a base for our first set of walks in the Bunya Mountains National Park. The camping areas in the National Park were not accessible for some of the group so we had opted for the comforts of Maidenwell Pub.

We arrived at the camping grounds in the Showground at the rear of the pub and set up. The wind had increased even more and Michael had to secure the tent to the car with 3 ropes to ensure it did not blow away. Most of the group went for a preliminary walk to Coomba Falls which was a steep and interesting walk but little water. Later on we availed ourselves of a welcome dinner at the pub and a game of pool, hoping the wind would abate, but it did not. That night we fell asleep listening to the wind gusts.

The next day we set off on the 25k trip to Bunya Mountains National Park and were amply rewarded by the display of wildlife as we had morning coffees at the cafe. The wallabies and birds were very tame, no doubt owing to the proximity of the café. Bushwalking in style yet again. But the coffees at the end of the second day’s walking were very welcome.

We set off, stopping first for a view from the high point of Mt Mowbullan which had an extensive panorama but a lot of smoke haze.

We set off on our first walk along the Scenic Circuit and walked through beautiful rainforest areas with abundant bunya and hoop pines. It was a welcome change from the dry landscape we had travelled through to arrive there. There were many other sights to see such as extensive strangler figs, stinging trees (look but don’t touch!), bird’s nest ferns and staghorns.  Unfortunately the many waterfalls were nearly all dry. Two of the group elected to return to the starting point by a shorter route where we saw a red bellied black snake and many different species of beautiful trees whilst most of the group carried on to Big Falls and Barker Creek Lookouts. …….

It had been arranged that a car pick up would take place at Paradise Park but through mis-communication this did not happen so some members got a longer walk than they bargained for.  This emphasised the need for clear communication on walks. But we all reconvened at the end for some much needed bunya nut ice-cream in the café.

That night we indulged in another meal at the Maidenwell Pub.

The next day we set off to the National Park again and walked the Westcliff Lookout walk. The northern walks were partly escarpment walks and we had some good views from the lookout and along the way, although they were not at their best because of the smoke from the extensive bushfires. We stopped temporarily at Westcott and then all but one continued on along the Koodaii Circuit loop walk.

Our final walk of the day was to the highest point of the National Park, the Mt Kiangarow track to the summit and back. It was a short but lovely walk through the scrubby bush with smatterings of rainforest. We admired the extensive arch of grass trees and wildflowers with an extensive view of the valley below at the end.

After coffee once again we returned to camp and decided to tough it out and actually cook for ourselves like real bushwalkers should. We fortified ourselves with Happy Hour first though. Up until that point Happy Hour had not been that happy or extensive, downright non-existent owing to the strong, cold winds. The winds had dropped a little and a welcome use was made of the awning of Stuart’s caravan for a few drinks and nibbles. We had a discussion in which we confirmed that unfortunately Girraween National Park, our next walking destination was closed due to the threat of bushfires. Some fires were still active in the area and some were growing, including the large one near Drake and the Bruxner Highway on the way home.

All this while Michael and Christine had been monitoring the ever increasing Shark Creek fire near our home via the RFS website and wondering if there would be anything left of Yurygir National Park at home for future walks. What had started out as a tiny fire weeks ago had grown to threaten Woolaweyah, Angourie and Yamba.

The next day we changed our plans and spent the day in Toowoomba sightseeing. We enjoyed the wonderful flower displays at the Queens Park Botanic Gardens, where we were lucky enough to see their preparations for the Flower Festival in a few weeks’ time, followed by lunch at the Cobb & Co Museum and a look at the extensive displays there.

After that we headed south to our planned camp at Sommerville Tourist Park. This had been planned as our base for walking in Girraween National Park as that has been closed for a while due to water shortages in the park. It was now also closed due to bushfire risk so we stayed for only one night there and enjoyed their lovely facilities but once again braving cold weather of about zero degrees. We set off home the next day by mutual agreement, cutting the trip short. Some took advantage of the shortened trip to go their separate ways and do other activities but walking trails in National Parks seemed to be in short supply.

We travelled south again and most stopped at our planned lunch break at the Standing Stones Cottage where Ray had thoughtfully booked a surprise birthday tea for one of the group. We procured two cakes and a candle as there were two birthdays to celebrate. We then headed down the range to arrive home.

Our Club of the Month for January 2021 is Clarence Valley Bushwalking Club

Clarence Valley Bushwalkers Inc. was founded in 1997 by a small Group of interested bushwalkers. Since then membership has grown to approximately 90 members.

Walks are held in a range of beautiful areas including New England National Park (including Cathedral Rocks, Woolpack Rocks, Point Lookout), Washpool National Park and Gibraltar Range National Park (including Anvil Rock and Dandahra Crags). The Club also canoes and kayaks local rivers and holds relaxing bicycle rides around Clarence Valley.

There are up to 5 scheduled club activities per month. These can include bushwalking of varying levels of difficulty, terrain and duration; kayaking/canoeing trips and overnight car-camps; full-pack weekend walks, social outings, and bicycle rides. The Group also undertakes interstate and overseas adventures. Activities that are dependent on suitable weather or tidal conditions can also be added to the program at short notice to take advantage of favourable conditions.

 

Child Protection Mandatory Reporting

On 1st October, 2020 the Office of the Children’s Guardian provided a webinar titled: Understanding your reporting obligations in sporting and local government organisations.

The recording for the webinar can be accessed here.

If you are listening from a place where children can hear the webinar the use of headphones is recommended.

 

Below is some information that was mentioned in the webinar and shared by Harris Short, Child Safe Coordinator, Local Government/Sport, Office of the Children’s Guardian.

For more information, click on the links provided.

 

Department and Communities and Justice (DCJ)

Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ), previously known as Family and Community Services (FaCS) or Department of Community Services (DoCS), is NSW’s statutory child protection agency. The Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998 and Regulation 2012 detail DCJ’s responsibilities in keeping children safe.

A key responsibility is that DCJ is responsible for assessing reports made to the Child Protection Helpline. While anyone in the community can make a report to the Child Protection Helpline, that a child or group of children might be at risk of significant harm, the Care and Protection Act makes it mandatory for some people who work or volunteer in certain roles. For more information https://www.facs.nsw.gov.au/families/Protecting-kids/mandatory-reporters/about

For guidance about making a mandatory report, using the mandatory reporter guide, to submit an e-report, or other information about mandatory reporting, visit https://reporter.childstory.nsw.gov.au/s/

JCPRP

The ‘Joint Child Protection Response Program’ (JCPRP), which used to be called JIRT, aims to provide a seamless service response to children and young people at risk of significant harm as a result of sexual assault, serious physical abuse and extreme neglect. JCPRP is a tri-agency program delivered by the NSW Police Force, Department of Communities and Justice and NSW Health. Joint Referral Unit (JRU) has a representative of each agency to work on joint decision-making around intake to JCPRP. JCPRP investigations are led by detectives from the Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad.

Reportable Conduct

Learn about your obligations under the Reportable Conduct Scheme in our 30min video.

You can find information on the Children’s Guardian website about:

  • Identifying reportable allegations
  • Heads of entities and reportable conduct responsibilities
  • Planning and conducting an investigation
  • Recognising and managing conflicts of interest etc.

 

Information provided by:

Harris Short | Child Safe Coordinator, Local Government/Sport | Office of the Children’s Guardian
www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au

Alternate Activities COVID-19 Update

We are all spending a lot of time indoors due to COVID-19.

So we thought it was a good time to revisit our awesome alternate activity ideas!

No need to do them alone! Connect with the group you were planning to head outdoors with online using programs such as Zoom or Skype. Have fun and feel good about these ‘indoor adventures’ together!

  1. Find and schedule the walks and activities you want to lead when life returns to normal
  2. Not a leader yet? Call a current club leader and ask if you can buddy up to learn to lead later – they are friendly folk!
  3. Read the Bushwalking Manual – a great read for everyone doing all kinds of outdoor adventure 🙂
  4. Get started on a first aid course – you can do the pre-reading online for free! https://pfa.stjohn.org.au/
  5. Connect online with a club buddy to plan a club activity together for later
  6. Read our Risk Management Guidelines – it is truly worthwhile
  7. Learn all about our insurance – consider becoming an insurance officer – ask us how
  8. Start planning and coordinating a risk management online training session for your club. You don’t have to know it all – ask club members with special expertise to talk on their area.
  9. Run a online navigation theory session for your club and friends
  10. Learn how you can help our suffering wildlife: WIRES & NWC
  11. Write to members of parliament to ask for a climate action leadership: Federal Ministers, NSW Members, ACT Members.
  12. Brainstorm how to engage more youth in your club
  13. Organise your photos and send in some great ones to us so we can share them through our newsletter and website – email to admin@bushwalkingnsw.org.au.
  14. Contribute your photos and descriptions of the great walks of NSW & the ACT to manual@bushwalkingvictoria.org.au
  15. Check out all the resources available for you on the Bushwalking NSW website
  16. Ask your club management committee if they need any help
  17. Sign up for a Bushwalking NSW working group
  18. Help Bushwalking NSW develop a Hot/Extreme Weather Policy that can help all our clubs – contact us now!
  19. Schedule club social events for the new year
  20. Look for great speakers for your next club meeting
  21. Call elderly neighbours, relatives and friends and find out how they are coping with the COVID-19 crisis
  22. If you haven’t done it yet – put your Bush fire survival plan at the top of your list!