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Lightweight Hiking

Lightweight Hiking

As we all know, the lighter your pack, the more you will enjoy your multi-day hiking adventure in Australia or overseas.

With this in mind, Byron Community College recently ran a Lightweight Hiking Course which gave participants expert advice on choosing the lightest affordable equipment and dehydrated food.

A highlight of the Course was a gourmet hike cooking class with dishes such as:

  • Miso soup
  • Linguine with speck, hard fried in ghee and garlic and embellished with fresh snow peas and shaved parmesan
  • Thai rice with coconut milk, lemon grass, snow peas and chilli tuna fillets
  • Chocolate chia pudding with coconut milk
  • Billy tea

The Course also included a local day ‘off track’ hike and the option of overnight camping and hiking experience.

The Lightweight Hiking Course was presented by Steve Millard from Byron Hikers who has extensive experience planning and leading hundreds of hikes all over Australia and the remote Indian Himalaya. Steve loves sharing his knowledge to encourage more people to experience the simple pleasures of hiking in the wilderness. Most importantly Steve wants more people to become aware of the need for conservation of our precious national parks and natural areas. Email Steve at byronhikers@gmail.com for more information.

This lightweight hiking class will run again through the Byron College in February/March 2023. For those keen to learn more hiking recipes the book Xtreme Gourmet has lots of information on ‘high energy, lightweight recipes for the outdoor enthusiast’.

 

Mudgee Bushwalking and Bike Riding Inc.

Three Capes Walk Tasmania, 13-16 September, Victoria Mcadam

Where would we be without our Elly and Joby who organised everything..
All 16 of us very happy traveler’s
say thank you.
Wouldn’t happen without all your effort.
We arrived in Hobart a little late, a slight moment of concern was had that the hire car company might be closed, we were reassured that the ‘bus’ was still in the parking lot and was waiting for us,
the kind gent at the desk had waited.
We mounted a search..
That parking lot was at least 3 million acres!!
Possibly more.
It was cold..
Right at the far end sat the bus!!!
We piled in..
Eric at the wheel and with Karen as the navigator we found our accommodation with ease..
the next day we proceeded to enjoy some shopping,
Some folks went to MONA.
I had no clue what MONA was until the
recount of the experience was given the next day with slightly graphic details of the images seen..
Others saw the botanic gardens.
2 lovely days in Hobart, scrummy breakfasts at the AWOL Cafe..
Seafood at the dock.
Mt Wellington and Mt Nelson
After strategically packing the bus the next day to start the drive to Port Arthur and the walking adventure, loading the humans in the bus who had to sit in the back first then filling every available space with back packs and suitcases..
We were on our way..
Like a very large can of laughing sardines..


This would be where I say this bunch of people are amazing,
What a pleasure to spend a week in their company.
Eric as our fearless organiser and driver,
May I say Eric works well under the pressure of having a bus full of sardines laughing and talking..
The walk began,
After a rather
zippy, splashy, chilly bracing,
boat ride we were dropped off in the middle of the freezing ocean…
Ok..
we only had to paddle to the beach but it was fresh up to the neck…
Ok up to the ankle..


Along the track the cabins were
Surveyor hut, Monroe and Retakauna,
Each camp site was fully equipped with a park ranger with a story, a poem or a slight horror story of an adventurer having a mishap to ‘entertain’ us..


Some of the track was set out so the walkers reach a viewing point, however the walk itself was as grand as the destination..the glimpses along the track of the rugged coast, the flowers, massive gum trees, the mosses, rain forests and the tree ferns, the amount of work put into the 20 million dollar walkway is evident under every footstep.
All the colours are stunning, together with an occasional sighting of a beautiful bird happy days were enjoyed.
The showers on the second night saw the rather distinct smell leave us.
I’m sure I saw a possum take flight
( I know possums can’t fly..
but this one had a go)
Off it went..
when a certain walker went in for a scrub..no names mentioned GH
A bucket or two of deliciously hot water hoisted up with a rope within the outdoor curved tin shower room.
Sublime!!
One of us might have snuck in an extra shower the next day….
Mwahahah
A successful walk for everyone..


Walking is a great conversation starter, to chat as you walk is a great way to get to know each other, hearing laughter up ahead is always a good sign.
Voices echoed words of delight at the sight of the views.
I’m sure we were all aching at the same rate by the end of the 4 days and some had a blister or two but we laughed, played cards and ate not very nice packet food..
life is so good.
As Fortesque Bay neared and the end of the walk came into view through the serious rain our bones were cold..
A night at The Fox and the Hound saw us scrubbed up and ready for dinner ..
Another night back at Hobart for diner at the oldest pub in Australia..
The bus was delivered back to the starting mark, undamaged and with no odour of smelly socks or soggy backpacks..
To have such a beautiful experience I consider us all to be incalculable lucky.

 

Our September Club: Mudgee Bushwalking and Bike Riding Inc.

Mudgee Bushwalking and Bike Riding Inc.’s current membership is over 70 with several Life Members and Junior members are always encouraged to join. There is a motivated committee to assist in the daily Club running’s but the organisation is very much a shared responsibility. Most riders also walk, but it doesn’t necessarily happen in reverse. About 60% do both activities.

The group meets quarterly, with the AGM held in June- 7pm start. Quarterly Meetings have a 7:00pm start. The Wednesday evening begins at 6pm in a local hostelry, where as many as wish meet for dinner. Then everyone adjourns to the Presbyterian Church Rooms in Mortimer Street, where they are joined by others for the formal meeting and a light supper.

Members volunteer to organise individual events for the coming three months, be it walks, rides or camping weekends. The committee form the co-ordination and oversee the activities to ensure all guidelines are met. Whatever happens, there will be something to do during many weekends. The first and third Sunday of the month have been allocated for an activity.

Riders also meet on Tuesday and Thursday mornings in Mudgee and on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in Kandos/Rylstone. Walks and rides are usually graded according to difficulty. Camping weekends are organised according to the time of year and climatic conditions. Many walks are relatively local, but some venture further a field. Longer bike rides are ably supported by non-biking members who provide back-up vehicles.

Members come from across the whole district as far north as the Totnes Valley and, in the south, from Rylstone and Kandos, Gulgong and Dunedoo. Hopefully there is always a good balance of locations for both walks and rides. Where possible, and if preferred car sharing helps with the economic use of transport.

There is no expectation for members to attend all events. People join in as they are able. The aim is to provide a program of events which is all inclusive. On occasions some members may be taken out of their comfort zone through a more challenging walk or ride. This is made possible by the brilliant support and encouragement of other more confident participants.

This year the club is celebrating over 30 years of walks and socials and meetings – (with around 15 members enjoying the “outback” for the past week)- alas 4 returned with Covid. We still have some of the inaugural members that are a true inspiration to us all. A few are now “Life Member’s” & do not participate unless we sneak them out of their retirement home or living quarters for a BBQ or social gathering

This week the Club purchased another piece of equipment – a GARMIN GPS 66i. We are quite proud of our new toy and we have been spending some time figuring it out! This compliments all the other Club devices ie PLB, Walkie Talkie, Defib, 2 fully outfitted first aid kits, – you never can be too sure or safe these days.

To further compliment the equipment we are hosting (club style) an “Education Day” for members where we dig out the maps & compass and back to basics and all equipment and let the experienced do a show & tell for the less or new keen members.

At our AGM in June we were successful in obtaining a keen new President Victoria Mcadam, who is interested to learn all the ropes and to encourage members along the way.

Newcastle Ramblers 60th Anniversary

Formed in 1961 as Newcastle YMCA Ramblers Bushwalking Club, the Club later became just Newcastle Ramblers. The club was due to celebrate its 60th birthday last year, but COVID caused several postponements. The celebration is now scheduled for Saturday 15 October and will be held at Rathmines Hall on Lake Macquarie.

The day will begin early with activities in the area for those interested (walks, kayaking and cycling) before a welcome and morning tea. Several members will then give short talks on the early days of the club and up to today. The talks will be followed by a catered lunch and more social time. For those interested there may be a barbecue in the park beside the lake afterwards.

Former members or anyone interested is welcome to attend. Even if you cannot come we would still like to hear from you.

Please contact Bob Clifton by email – robert.clifton@outlook.com.au or by phone on 0417 624 091 by 15 September.

Wilsons Prom 1996

 

The Bush Club

Hidden Sydney – Balmain, Monday 18 July 2022, Col Prentice and Trevor McAlister

A total of 25 Bush Club participants discovered Hidden Sydney while walking from Circular Quay to Circular Quay via Balmain and the ferry. Participants benefited from the combined expertise of two experienced leaders/historians while walking around this most interesting of Sydney’s suburbs. Col Prentice lead the morning session and Trevor McAlister lead after lunch.

Our walk was mostly on pavement and explored places in Balmain that we probably hadn’t been to before while alerting us to traces of history that still remain visible today. There was a brief commentary and plenty of opportunity to stroll and reflect on Sydney’s past.

Highlights of the walk included a widows’ walk, a tram drivers’ dunny, a policeman’s out-house, a house of a former NSW Premier (he sired 17 children and married at 80; can you guess who?), a cross harbour tunnel built in 1924, a place celebrated for the first game of Rugby League played, a spectacularly fine day, a sea voyage, a bus ride and a happy, outgoing and generous group of people. All this and more could have been yours if you had taken the opportunity to join us. And remember, twelve panes of glass equals one Georgian cottage and regular exercise equals longevity. We all look forward to seeing you next time!

Our August Club: The Bush Club

The Bush Club started on 19th September 1939, mainly as a result of the initiative of Marie Byles and Paddy Pallin. Marie was concerned that the rather rigorous tests to obtain entry to bush walking clubs existing at the time excluded genuine lovers of the bush who were unwilling or unable to pack walk and camp out overnight. Marie believed that the essential qualifications for members should be a genuine love of the bush, a desire to protect it and a willingness to extend the hand of friendship to other bushwalkers.

Paddy had similar motivation in joining with Marie to form the club. He hoped the club would comprise walkers of moderate ability who would not be forced to indulge in camping if they had no wish to do so. Paddy was also strongly of the view that if people became bushwalkers they would also become lovers of the bush and would join the ranks of the conservationists seeking its protection. These thoughts remain the main aim of the Bush Club.

Today The Bush Club organises fun activities in the outdoors. From easy strolls to the adrenaline tough walks; from lakes to mountains; and from the city to the magical bush. The Club believes that getting outdoors and enjoying the wonderful bush around us is a great boost for the body and soul.

Joining The Bush Club is a great way to meet new people and make great friends. Club members are a diverse and friendly bunch who share experiences, learn new things and help each other along the way.

 

Happy 90th Birthday Bushwalking NSW and Blue Gum Forest!

On 21 July it will be 90 years since the Federation of Bushwalking Clubs (now Bushwalking NSW) held its inaugural meeting. Soon after, on 2 September, we’ll see the 90th anniversary of the reservation of the iconic Blue Gum Forest, in the Grose Valley, following a campaign by bushwalkers.

The two events are not unrelated. The success of the collective action by the walkers had encouraged them to form the umbrella group which would assist Myles Dunphy and others in their campaigns to create national parks. Blue Gum Forest was the kernel of today’s Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, and is the cradle of the modern conservation movement in NSW. You can read more about this in Andy Macqueen’s book “Back from the Brink: Blue Gum Forest and the Grose Wilderness”, which is available at Blue Mountains bookshops and here.

Celebratory campout

The saving of Blue Gum Forest will be celebrated on the weekend of 3-4 September 2022 by a campout in the Grose Valley, at The Meadow (near Acacia Flat). Attendance will be limited to members of clubs affiliated with Bushwalking NSW, and their families.

The agenda will include a ceremony at the forest on Saturday afternoon and a communal campfire in the evening. On Sunday morning some interpretive ambles will be on offer, the topics including birds, plants and geology.

The activity is being organised by volunteers, with the support of NPWS. Participants will have to make their own way in and out of the valley. Numbers will be capped at 80. Registration is essential and will be on a first-in-first-served basis. All participants:

  • Must be a member of a bushwalking club, or accompany such a person as a member of their family.
  • Will preferably be in a party organised under the rules of that club.
  • Must be experienced and self-reliant overnight walkers, or in the care of such a person. The access tracks are steep and involve 600 metres of vertical descent/ascent.
  • Are expected to car-pool, to limit traffic congestion at the track-heads.
  • Be packed up and making their way out of the valley by noon on Sunday.

Further details, including advice concerning track conditions (and closures if any) will be sent to registrants prior to the weekend.

For all enquiries please email Monica Nugent at monica.nugent@environment.nsw.gov.au

Every person, including family members, must be registered. REGISTER HERE.

Hill View Bushwalkers

A wander in Hornsby, Normanhurst, Waitara & Wahroonga, 8 July 2022, Barbara R

After a week of flooding rain, necessitating the cancellation of the three planned walks for July 8th, a huge mob (41) of Hill View Bushwalkers turned up at Hornsby Station to enjoy an urban walk in brilliant sunshine.

After a longer briefing than usual, which included some history of the area, we headed west past the murals in Dural Lane and on to Frederick Street where we saw the hidden away but impressive California bungalow house & large garden of Leo & Florence Cotton.

Leo Cotton was a highly regarded geologist who became Professor of Geology at Sydney University after the retirement of his mentor & friend Sir Tannatt William Edgeworth David, also a Hornsby resident. Both men went to Antarctica in 1907-8 with Mawson & Shackleton. Leo’s brother Max (also a scholar) bought part of the Cotton property in 1917 to develop Lisgar Gardens. Florence Cotton Reserve (opposite the Frederick St house) is named after Leo’s wife who died in 1930 after only twenty years of marriage.

We crossed Waitara Creek on a bridge near Carcoola Crescent & soon found a hidden pathway & steps through bushland to the crossing of a tributary creek & ascent to a pleasant morning tea spot behind Normanhurst Scout Hall & overlooking the valley.

We realised that was enough flirtation with soggy bushland for the day! Later, a foot track & path were followed from Dartford Road on the southern side of the railway line to Normanhurst Station & Edwards Road from where we walked up quiet Russell Avenue to the source of Waitara Creek & to Pennant Hills Road. Soon another hidden lane off the Pacific Highway was followed to Anulla Place Reserve from where we made our way to & through bushland behind The Grange & through this 1980s Retirement Village to Waitara Station.

At this stage we had walked over 9kms so twelve people decided they’d enjoyed enough exercise for the day & caught a train to their various destinations. Those who had their sights set on lunch in Wahroonga Park, followed the highway SE to Carden Avenue then a path that follows the railway to a footbridge over the M1, on to Warwilla Avenue & the pedestrian rail overpass to our lunch destination. Nine stalwarts stayed for excellent coffee at the Coonanbarra Cafe opposite the park.

On the approximately 13km walk we only (temporarily & briefly) lost three people! Not bad considering the crowd. 😂 Lessons were learnt… & the abandoned were gracious… The usual HVB camaraderie reached a new level after the week of watery isolation and a great time was had by all.

Leaders: Barbara R & Steve

Walkers: Helen A, Nick B, Barbara C, Susan, Rhondda, Ann D, Tim, Elaine, Michael, Jane, John G, Ros G, Christine G, Carol, Celia, Cherry, Kas, Chris McA, Bill McD, Lydia, John M, Hazel, Margaret P, Wendy P, Pragati, David R, Anne R, Christine S, John S, Jenny S, Nick S, Sue S, Lyn, Cleona, Louis, Don W as well as visiting walkers Rosemary Wade (becoming our newest member), Irene Soon & Cheong Lai

Thanks to Nick B for being tail end Charlie.

Our thanks to Barbara R for planning the route and for many hours of historical research.

Our July Club: Hill View Bushwalkers

Hill View Bushwalkers (HVB) has Friday walks from mid-February to mid-November. HVB began in a small way in the early 1970s, growing gradually and retaining a quite informal structure. The spirit of friendship and care that was nurtured in those early years has been maintained, and it is rewarding to be associated with this group.

We are an incorporated group affiliated with Bushwalking NSW. We have walks at three levels of activity led by members who volunteer to lead walks that appeal to them.

The Plus walking group usually has a walk ranging from 14 to 20 kilometres, with substantial ascents and descents though the distance may be less in difficult terrain.

The Regular walking group will usually walk between 9 and 13 kilometres, with less vigorous climbs.

A third group, the EZY walking group, is for those who now find the first two types of walk a bit difficult and wish to walk at a slower pace, with walks of up to 8 kilometres. These walks are currently held fortnightly.

We tend to have a fairly mature membership that includes many part-time workers and retired people.

A weekend away is occasionally arranged to a place where there is low-cost accommodation and good day walks, such as the Snowy Mountains or NSW South Coast.

Members have two six-month programs each year, providing a weekly walk from mid February until mid November.

Development of each program starts with a subcommittee preparing a list of proposed walks. This is then circulated to members, who indicate which walks they are prepared to lead (two leaders to each walk). When all the gaps are filled the program is finalised and published. Walks are all within reach of a one day trip from the meeting point in Turramurra, enabling us to walk in the Blue Mountains, the Central Coast and Royal National Park areas as well as in Sydney.

The number of participants is not limited (unless by COVID restrictions) and leaders make arrangements to ensure all walkers are included.

Every walk has 2 First Aiders nominated. First Aid training is encouraged by a substantial subsidy towards the cost.

The leaders walk the track shortly before leading a group in order to ensure the conditions are suitable.

If the advertised walk needs to be modified, or leaders judge that participants need more information, then a WALKS ADVISORY is issued.

We usually drive with car pooling, but where possible we use public transport.

We are COVID safe. Our program and procedure is modified in response to COVID restrictions as appropriate.

Coffs Hikers

Coffs Hikers climb Tuckers Nob, Orara West State Forest/Bindarra National Park, March 2022, Yvonne, Coffs Hikers

Tuckers Nob is a local landmark, with a great view to the Dorrigo escarpment, and the Bellinger Valley to the sea. In March, walkers from Coffs Hikers set off from the north side of the mountain following Frontage Creek up steeply through Orara West State Forest on logging tracks.

Close to the top is a track labelled on the map as “That Steep Bit”, and it is certainly steep! The forest vegetation changes as we approach the summit (874 metres) and the view opens up. There is a geocache hiding here.

After a rest on a rough hewn bench to enjoy our lunch, we start cautiously down that steep bit again, stopping on the way to admire Fig Tree Falls in full flow after rain. Then it’s back to the cars to clean off the mud and remove any free passengers (aka leeches).

Our June Club: Coffs Hikers

Coffs Hikers is a new Bushwalking NSW club in Coffs Harbour on the mid-north coast, with a fast-growing membership. The Club is spoilt for choice with many national parks, state forests, coastal walks, creeks and the great escarpment offering many opportunities for wild explorations! The Club currently offers day walks, overnight walks and camping, but hope to offer cycling and kayaking in future.

In the Club’s first six months, 84 club members have enjoyed 321 outdoor experiences together on 39 activities. These have included soggy off-track in the jungle, steep climbs to lookouts, camping at Gibraltar Ranges, map and compass training and gentler coastal rambles.

For more information visit the Club website or Facebook page. In addition Coffs Trails publishes routes of many walks in the Coffs area.

 

Sydney Bush Walkers

A Week of Walks, Kosciuszko National Park, Christmas/New Year 2021/22, Sydney Bush Walkers, Report by John Kennett, Photos by John Pozniak

Between Christmas and New Year 2021/22 myself and thirty other members of Sydney Bush Walkers (SBW) travelled, walked and gathered on the trails and in the ski-lodges of beautiful Kosciuszko National Park.

Every day we embarked on a different walk and were rewarded with the sight of brilliant blue skies, beautiful weather and voluminous wildflowers. Among the fantastic locations we visited were the Iconic Trails, Mt Twynham, Ramshead, Dead Horse Gap, Guthega, Mt Anton and Mt Tate.

To cap off a successful week our visit concluded with 2022 New Year’s Eve celebrations which were thoroughly enjoyed by all.

Our March Club: Sydney Bush Walkers

Our club of the month, Sydney Bush Walkers is one of Australia’s largest and oldest Bushwalking Clubs. SBW was founded in 1927 and has a membership of around 850.

The club offers challenging day and multi-day walks including extended 12 day (or more) trips.  Canyoning is a very popular club activity in the warmer months.

SBW volunteer trip leaders are experienced walkers who aim to maximise members enjoyment of the outdoors while also ensuring the safety of all walkers. While SBW leaders foster group co-operation participants are also expected to be self-sufficient to ensure that all members cope with walk conditions and challenges that arise.

While the Sydney Bushies provide a range of bush experiences, they also offer a great social network of like minded, outdoorsy types. A SBW membership provides a unique opportunity for bush lovers to develop skills, increase confidence and meet new like-minded friends!

The club holds monthly information nights for people who are considering joining (book here). For more information visit the SBW website or Facebook Page.

 

 

Watagan Wanderers Bushwalking Club

3 day hike, Barrington Tops NP, February 2022, Watagan Wanderers Bushwalking Club, Report & Images David Whyte

This hike was meant to be down Paterson’s Gorge but the predicted rain made that walk too dangerous. A nice alternative in the same area, and one we have done before, was to walk to Selby Alley hut and do a day walk from there around Edwards Swap.

The walk starts up with a steady climb up the Corker trail. The tall trees of the ancient beech forest add a lovely atmosphere to this walk and in summer offer a lot of shade. We have done this walk in winter where you are enclosed by mist. The lunch time break offers a magnificent view of Carey Peak in the distance which was our destination the next day

As we reached the top of the Corker track and it started to level out, we kept our eye out for a special dead tree marking the slightly hidden track to Selby Alley hut. It felt magical as we followed this secret path through dense forest, and then spotted the hut sitting just across from a beautiful stream that was softly meandering through sub tropical rainforest past the hut to nearby Basden Falls. We arrived at the hut mid afternoon giving us plenty of time to set up our tents and collect firewood. Despite being summer it was quite cool.

Leaving our tents up we set off the next day for a 20km walk around Edwards Swamp stopping at Careys Peak on the way. The clear morning offered stunning views over the valley below and the ridge that the Corker Trail follows. We spotted a few feral horses during the day and were saddened by how much broom there was growing; The Aeroplane hill track was quite dense in some areas. We cooked our dinner out in the open next to the fire and during the night the rain started to set in. We returned to our cars the next day via the corker trail in mist and listened to the sounds of lyre birds as we descended.

Our February Club: Watagan Wanderers Bushwalking Club

The Watagan Wanderers was established in the early 90s to meet the needs of people in The Central Coast, Lake Macquarie and Newcastle areas. It has an active program of providing day and multiday hikes over most of Australia and overseas. Though, since Covid the walks have become much more local. The club also has keen cycling, kayaking and abseiling groups. Our program can be found on our website.

Southern Highlands Bushwalkers

Mount Jellore, Nattai National Park, Southern Highlands Bushwalkers

A recent walk that Southern Highlands Bushwalkers managed to slot between various lockdowns was a hike up Mt Jellore in Nattai National Park. It had been couple of years since the Club had been on the Mount Jellore Walk as it has only recently re-opened after the bushfires.

There is a short walk to a rocky outcrop where you get the first view of the mountain, then a steep drop to a creek, followed by a steep walk up to the fire trail that leads to the base of Mt Jellore. From there it is a zig zag track up to the summit. There is now a lot of waist high regrowth. The trig at the top had survived the fires and from the peak you can see Sydney on a clear day. We took the alternative route back to the start which also involved a drop down to a creek followed by a climb back out.

Nattai NP offers beautiful wilderness and rugged walking experiences. The park is conveniently located close to several towns and features spectacular scenery and landscapes including sandstone cliffs, rainforests and woodlands. Walks in Nattai NP include Couridjah Corridor, Mount Jellore, Starlight’s or Nattai River.

Our January Club: Southern Highlands Bushwalkers

Southern Highlands Bushwalkers is an outdoor activities club which develops friendships through exploring natural wilderness and National Parks. The Club endeavours to plan activities to suit the needs of both individuals and families. Club activities range from short day walks to overnight backpacking hikes and car camp out weekends. However, other special activities may also be included in the Club’s programme.

The Club was formed in 1990 as the Highland Adventurers then underwent a name change to become the Southern Highlands Bushwalkers (Inc) in 1994. Since inception, membership has grown to about 60 and the members hail from as far afield as Palm Beach in the north to Goulburn in the south.

Southern Highlands Bushwalkers holds activities in the Mittagong, Bowral, Berrima area of the Southern Highlands of New South Wales. This area has a great diversity of flora and fauna and access to many national parks and forested areas. Most of the local area is undulating to steep, easy walks are very few and a reasonable standard of fitness is required.

The worn Sydney sandstone of the area offers some many interesting and beautiful windblown features with views from ridges into valleys, creeks and gullies. These offer glimpses of lush cool rain forest, eroded sculptured landscapes and stunning views down the valleys formed by the rivers such as the Nattai.

The club offers mostly day walks from moderately easy to strenuous with a range of overnight backpacks or car camps and the occasional trips to more distant destinations. Off track walking may be through thick and difficult vegetation which requires experience and good navigation skills. The Club also does coastal walks, mainly in the Illawarra as well as some on Sydney Harbour.

 

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